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04.
September
2013

Strom-Bednar Atlas AO on the New Zealand

Atlas 5000 was demonstrated in four different situations across three farms. The most impressive demonstration was into grass seed stubble in South Canterbury in rolling fields often referred to in New Zealand as downs country with very good soil for cropping and good drainage as well as the water can drain away on the slopes, in this situation ...

 
Atlas 5000 was demonstrated in four different situations across three farms. The most impressive demonstration was into grass seed stubble in South Canterbury in rolling fields often referred to in New Zealand as downs country with very good soil for cropping and good drainage as well as the water can drain away on the slopes, in this situation the grass is harvested by a combine often with a draper front for seed. The crop had been harvested twice so harvested once and allowed to grow again and harvested a second time.


Following this the grass seed stubble is mown very low with a disc mower and grass harvested and baled. So essentially three incomes derived from the same crop.
   

Atlas was pulled with a 280 Hp Case MX 285 in the rolling countryside with the clay & loam downs soil type needing a bit more horsepower to maintain working speed of 11-12 km/h on the hills. In the first demonstration the Atlas was pulled comfortably with a John Deere 7200R, 200Hp. Demo on the MX 285 went very well considering it was more a primary working situation, the grass seed had started to develop a root structure so was similar conditions to discing in a 2 year sward, grass seed had been planted for 18 months. Certainly not a permanent pasture situation but quite a tricky soil type and contour. 
   

In other demonstrations we went into a primary discing situation which is where we see a big future for the Atlas in flat land and rolling farms due to the length of the machine. This was with the John Deere 7200R. The our machine performed very well.

Features that farmers & contractors like about the Atlas is the:

1.    Front Support Wheels means the machine is very stable in work
2.    High trip pressure (200 Kg) on the individually sprung discs, a lot more pressure than a conventional rubber mounted or (dura-torque system) we talk about in New Zealand so better in heavy soils.
3.    They like the way the reset springs are mounted within a fully welded casing.
4.    Also the bearing systems appear to look pretty robust, important as there are a lot of stones in some of these conditions in the South Island. In fact the stones are such that often big wide cultivators are used with a trip system on the Tyne instead of disc machines.
5.    Depth of work with the 620mm blades means the machine is better able to handle more s
   
 

Background to South Island Seed Cropping Market

New Zealand has a good market for grass seed which is re-sown by particularly in the North Island following dry conditions where their pastures can lose persistence and need to regularly re-sown often direct drilled. Many of New Zealand’s seed crops are sold to northern hemisphere markets as there is a seasonal window where crops can’t be produced in the Northern Hemisphere. The drier conditions in the South Island of New Zealand with ideal rainfall for crops and hot north westerly winds at harvest time enable seed crops to be grown and harvested. Good rainfall in the Southern Alps a mountain range that completely divides the South Island provides plentiful water for irrigation. 
   

Burning is still allowed in New Zealand although for how long no one knows? Sometimes there are bans on burning if conditions are very dry and there is a fire risk/ hazard.


Brent Raikes
Sales Manager |  4AG LTD